Black Voices in Berlin: Listen to these Talented Poets from Europe’s Black Diaspora

Black Voices in Berlin: Listen to these Talented Poets from Europe’s Black Diaspora

With our previous guides about the cultural contributions of Brazilian, Syrian, and Vietnamese creative people living in Berlin (and many others) we have already shed some light on the benefits of living in a city that embraces its international community. With this new feature, we are drawing a wider circle by highlighting some extraordinary talents from Europe’s black diaspora that will come together these days for the poesiefestival Berlin.

In a time like now, it becomes abundantly clear that we urgently need to listen more to Black voices. And what better voices to listen to, than those of poets and thinkers. The online edition of the 21st poesiefestival in Berlin that will be celebrating its opening night today has a beautifully diverse program with talents from all around the world. But one event has especially caught our attention.

Congolese poet Fiston Mwanza Mujila has been mapping the poetry of poets of African origin in Europe for some time now, as he found that black poets are not represented enough in the European poetry circuit. He found a lot of powerful texts that need to be heard, experiences from Africa and Europe that need to be shared. For the event “Unheard Poetry: Europe’s Black Diaspora” he is bringing some of the Black poets he found together, and I think it’s really important we listen to them.

In this feature, we want to introduce you to the talented Black poets that will present their work in this special event, as well as a few other events from the program of the festival. With each poet, we included a link to the event they participate in where you can watch the live stream, or a recording later on. Now it’s up to you, to listen.

Read on…

At a Distance: A Stripped-Down Look at Social Distancing

At a Distance: A Stripped-Down Look at Social Distancing

photos: Aja Jacques. 

While the pandemic and the lockdown have been pretty devastating for artists and creative professionals economically, they certainly have not been lacking in being an inspiration. In the last weeks, we received quite wonderful submissions from photographers and artists all dealing with the different aspects of the pandemic and how they influence our life, among them the Stay At Home series, the corona comics, and a curious techno song. The latest project we want to introduce you to today is dealing specifically with one of the measures to contain the spread of the virus: social distancing.

Aja Jacques is one of the artists from our Uncensored Berlin exhibition that we hosted back in 2018 and that dealt with censorship of artists through social media platforms. Aja was not only one of our muses acting as a model for several of our photographers, but she also exhibited her own photos. Her new project “At A Distance” is a series of analog nude self-portraits she took with several fellow Berliners in prominent public places – at a safe distance of two meters. We talked with her about the series and about how the quarantine has been for her so far.

Read on…

This Photographer Takes Beautiful Remote Portraits via Whatsapp

This Photographer Takes Beautiful Remote Portraits via Whatsapp

photos: Lilika Strezoska. 

History has proven to us time and time again that necessity truly is the mother of invention. In 2020 this saying strikes again, as these spectacularly unusual times have driven people to find solutions for the limitations that the wake of the pandemic has brought upon our daily lives. As the routines of our private and work life have been rethought, we want to shed light on ways especially creative people have found, to still exercise their craft. The no contact rule has sparked ideas, that allow our creative Berliners to pursue their passions even in times of crisis.

One fantastic example is Lilika Strezoska. The talented photographer has moved to Berlin one and a half years ago to study Communication Design at the University of Applied Sciences – way before the pandemic changed our lives. Given that we are all to stay home and facetime, rather than meet in person, she came up with a simple solution to still take pictures of what she loves most in photography: people.

Read on…

Face Masks for Queer Visibility

Face Masks for Queer Visibility

With literally every single queer bar, club and venue closed until further notice and all Pride parades and other queer festivals canceled this year, it looks pretty dim on the queer visibility front right now. But all clubs and bars are closed and festival canceled – what difference does it make, you might wonder? Of course, every nightlife and cultural space has its importance – but for the queer community these places and events are not just for fun and socializing, they are important platforms for activism and for the fight for acceptance and equality. There is still a lot of homophobia and transphobia in the world, even here in Berlin. Queer visibility is an important act against those nasty phobias – and for queers to disappear into quarantine behind locked doors and behind anonymous masks is quite the setback.

Musician, stage performer, editor, and Berlin’s only real Diva Kaey has come up with a clever plan on how queer visibility can continue in a creative way in times of Corona. For over a month now, she has taken the time during the quarantine to sew hundreds of colorful facemasks with rainbows, sequins, and Tom of Finland prints for the queer community. This way we can be out and proud every day when we’re complying with the new face mask rules in the city.

Read on…

What Does Home Mean to You?

What Does Home Mean to You?

Berliners and their apartments continue to serve as an inspiration to numerous projects, including this recent photography series portraying Berliners through their windows in times of Corona. But now more than ever, we especially need projects that aim to connect people. That’s the goal of Nomads at home – an online network for quarantined Berliners which collects their various definitions of home.

Nomads at home is a project created by the architect Zuzanna Kotecka. It’s an online space for quarantined Berliners to showcase their idea of home and connect with others, with the aim to establish ”a network of people that support each other, personally and professionally.” Each entry on the website features a particular Berliner, along with their photo, job description, country of origin and an answer to the question ”What does home mean to you?”.

Read on…

Stay at Home: Portraying Berliners through their Windows

Stay at Home: Portraying Berliners through their Windows

photos: Lovis Ostenrik. 

These last couple of weeks it became almost a mantra: Stay at home! Angela Merkel said it, viral expert Drosten said it, your mom said it, we said it. It’s in everyone’s ears, and in everyone’s mouths.

But what does “staying at home” mean for everybody? It’s certainly not the same for everyone. If you’re living alone in a dark studio apartment in the backyard it can certainly start to feel claustrophobic at some point. But if you’re lucky to live in a big bright Altbau with balcony (or even better: a garden) together with loved ones, it can also be pretty ok in the end. No matter if it’s a big sacrifice or just a small one, the importance as one of the most significant measures to battle this pandemic cannot be denied.

Read on…

A Leap of Faith with a Whole Lot of Glitter: A Story of Making it as an Artist in Berlin Today

A Leap of Faith with a Whole Lot of Glitter: A Story of Making it as an Artist in Berlin Today

photo: Nathan Thomas

What does it take to step into the art world of a city intimidatingly overflowing with non-appreciated creative potential?

iHeartBerlin writer Andy sat down with his friend Qeas Pirzad—scene-beloved socialite, out-and-proud Sagittarius, every dance floor’s favorite disco queen, and up-and-coming contemporary artist—to find out what that challenging path can be like.

The result is an intimate conversation—laying open the artist’s personal creative journey, venturing into the consequences of following your dreams, and the revelation that doing something out of the ‘Berlin box’, makes you even more ‘Berlin’ in the end.

Read on…

Join the Fearless Fitness Experience with Marathon Icon Kathrine Switzer

Join the Fearless Fitness Experience with Marathon Icon Kathrine Switzer

Advertisement. 

The big Berlin Marathon is upon us later this week and as a special treat, Airbnb has invited the international marathon icon Kathrine Switzer to Berlin for a Fearless Fitness Experience that you can participate in now!

Switzer has become famous as the first official female runner in the Boston Marathon back in 1967. Until that time it was an unwritten rule that women could not participate in marathons because they were physically not capable of it. That was until Switzer broke the rules and took part in the 67’s marathon anyway as part of a team with two guys. While most other men in the race were impressed by Switzer it was the race director Jock Semple that ran after her and tried to stop her, only to be pushed off the race track by Switzer’s boyfriend and athlete Tom Miller.

Read on…

A Guide to Thai Creatives, Projects and Places in Berlin

A Guide to Thai Creatives, Projects and Places in Berlin

photo: Robert Rieger. 

Berlin is a generous and welcoming host to people from all around the world. Last week we gave you a glimpse into how you can experience Brazil in Berlin, but this week we’ve found the best bits of Thailand that exist right in our Berlin backyard. From Thai photographers, musicians and curators to great, authentic restaurants sprinkled around the city, you can find Thai culture right around the corner if you’re looking in the right places. 

Our guide has been created in collaboration with the newly formed collective un.thai.tled that is hosting a really interesting event this coming Saturday bringing together some of the best elements of Thai culture with the first edition of a “Thai Evening in Berlin”

Read on to see how you can experience Thai culture in the heart of Berlin.

Read on…

An Artist Studio Visit at the Historic Villa Heike

An Artist Studio Visit at the Historic Villa Heike

We got an inside look at the atelier of artists Johanna Dumet and Manuel Wroblewski in anticipation of the upcoming Berlin Art Week—for which Johanna and Manuel are opening their studio to the public. Johanna skips down the steps of a giant cascading staircase held up by strong Greco-Roman-style columns when she greets me. The smell of oil paint fills the room, and Johanna’s shorts are spattered with vibrant specks of pigment.

When you step inside the Villa Heike, you leave Berlin behind and enter an ornate, yet industrial, version of ancient times. The tall ceiling and decorative columns are what you’d see in an old museum, but the art is refreshingly contemporary, standing out against the barren architecture. After climbing a few flights of stairs, we enter Johanna and Manuel’s atelier. I’m struck immediately by the light—on the top floor of the Villa Heike, their space is illuminated by huge windows facing southwest.

Read on…