Berlin Illustrations That Will Melt Your Heart

Berlin Illustrations That Will Melt Your Heart

The internet’s just great, isn’t it? Giving you access to the coolest blogs (like iHeartBerlin!! ūüėé ), and also to discovering artists you wouldn’t otherwise: Jenny O’Boyle is one of them, and her illustrations will make you want to hug them. Jenny is a professional illustrator, running both a physical store at Wissmannstr. 21 and an online shop, both called¬†b√§r von pappe (meaning bear of cardboard), selling her work as well as a line of sustainable stationery. Everything she designs is super cute, and we’d suggest ¬†once you find yourself near Hermannplatz, looking for a cute notebook in which to write about all your Berlin adventures, that you go and check out her stuff.

Lovers of all things Berlin as we are, what caught our eye is one of the artist’s city-themed projects, where she sets out to explore an object for each street of Berlin, and in this way, guide us around every neighborhood by means of illustration. Massive undertaking as it sounds, she’s done, however, a beautiful job so far, taking us from one massive monument, building, subway station or fountain to the next all the way from Mitte, over Kreuzberg, down to Neuk√∂lln. Here are some of her Berlin-themed artworks.

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Time Traveling with Interactive Maps of Berlin

Time Traveling with Interactive Maps of Berlin

Kottbusser Tor, 1902

A lot of us might have felt the urge the escape the present since last Monday. Although we were planning to share this interesting project that takes you onto a virtual journey in Berlin in some more peaceful circumstances, let’s take the current opportunity to appreciate how Berlin has remained a glorious capital throughout many different times of social anxiety and political instability.

The appropriately named Time Travel Berlin website is a complex project bringing us closer to the history of Berlin. What I mostly enjoy about it is although it does make you learn a lot about history, it does so in a completely unbiased manner that rather encourages making your own judgement. The non-profit project, created by Alexander Darda, depicts Berlin in 8 different periods of time (one of them is even in the future, but only on the German site!), providing only a few sentences of background information about each of them.

Each year listed up on the website is a link to an intricate Berlin map, enriched with multiple interactive points. Those take you to pictures of buildings that used to exist in Berlin at the given time. I recommend you to take some time out of your schedule to enjoy this project, because just a fleeting look over any of the maps may make you feel literally lost among the dark alleys of the past. After you’ve approached the website with enough attention, though, you’ll find it a very rewarding experience.

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