Art

Welcome to Latin America: An Immersive Art Installation in Berlin

photos: Alejandro Arretureta

If you like immersive art you need to check out the current exhibition at Hamburger Bahnhof. As one of the nominees of this year’s “Preis der Nationalgalerie” Berlin-based Venezuelan artist Sol Calero has transformed a couple of rooms of the museum into the so called “Amazonas Shopping Center”. You can walk through various rooms such as a travel agency, cyber cafe, a hair salon, a dance studio, a cinema, a driving school and a money exchange and even sit down and interact with the scenarios. Each room is wonderfully colorful and combines aesthetics of the tropics of Latin America with traditional architectural elements. What is fascinating is her process of self-exotifying her own heritage and playing with cliches of Latin culture. But apart from that it’s just an incredibly fun exhibition to hang out in and soak up every little detail. Some impressions after the jump. You can still catch the exhibition until January 14, 2018. If you like this artwork you can vote for Sol to win the audience price right here.

Frank by
on December 19th, 2017
in Art

Night Falls on the Berlin of the Roaring 20s

illustrations: Robert Nippoldt

Berlin in the time of the Weimar Republic is one of the city’s most thrilling periods and no wonder many have tried to revive this time – for instance with this Second Life animation. There’s a new illustration book coming out now that will take you on a joyride through that enchanted section of the city’s past – we tell you what you can expect inside.

The German illustrator Robert Nippoldt has been following a brilliant concept while creating his subsequent books. ”Night falls on the Berlin of the Roaring 20s” is already his third work, after ”Hollywood in the 30s” and ”Jazz. New York in the Roaring 20s” that takes the readers on a time travel. Nippoldt’s illustrations are accompanied by stories and anecdotes gradually unraveling the secrets of a particular era.

Michalina by
on December 8th, 2017
in Art, Books

Rebuilding the Holocaust Memorial in front of the Home of Björn Höcke

The Holocaust Memorial right in the center of Berlin is definitely a controversial sight. From tourist taking selfies on it for their Tinder(or Grindr)-Profiles to right-wing politicians calling it a monstrosity, the poor memorial has received quite a lot of attention for the wrong reasons. But we have to bring you a tremendous news. The Memorial is not alone anymore because since yesterday a second Holocaust Memorial was build right in front of the home of Björn Höcke. Who is the horrible right-wing politician that insulted the memorial in the first place.

In just one day the Zentrum für Politische Schönheit (Center für Political Beauty), the artist collective responsible for the idea, collected almost 80 000 EUR donation via crowdfunding to build this memorial exceeding their goal way ahead of time.

Of course, this provocation by the Berlin-based collective which is well known for its cool but always controversial art projects is already targeted by angry Nazis that want to get rid of it.  Let’s hope they won’t succeed and that the memorial stays there for quite a while. Chapeau to this funny and very disruptive way of using art for political protest.

Claudio by
on November 23rd, 2017
in Art, Videos

Dancing in the Neon Forest – Memory of Dislocation

Dancing in the Neon Forest – Memory of Dislocation

Berlin has become the home of many performance artists from around the world that find a space, opportunities, and connections here to create their own work. I often sit in the audience of these performances, and for me it feels like a privilege to be in contact with their creators. Listening and experiencing their stories from a foreign world is a unique way of traveling – more than anything else (of course with a little help of your imagination).

The dancer and choreographer Jair Luna takes you on journey to his homeland Colombia with his new solo piece Memory of Dislocation – Exactly the same in the opposite direction. In an abstract autobiographic narrative the young performer travels with his audience through light, space and time, from a Berlin dance floor to a forest of neon lights that seems like a beautiful yet dangerous cage, just to fall back in movements and stories from his hometown and childhood. You immediately feel like you are part of his storyline. You have to give up the passiveness, walk around the stage and just follow the path of a young man into his future.

Claudio by
on November 17th, 2017
in Art, Theater

A Monument made of Buses at Brandenburger Tor

A couple of days ago a quite unusual sight came into being at Brandenburger Tor. Three disused busses where erected like poles right by the backside of the gate. What is the meaning of that you might wonder? The installation was made by the artist Manaf Halbouni and it was already on display in Dresden earlier this year. It caused a bit of protests from the right wing, but generally people were quite stunned by it.

But what is the meaning of these mysterious busses? The installation is a reference to a photo that was taken in 2015 in war-ridden Aleppo. It showed busses that were put up just like that as shields against the gunfire. Titled “Monument” the piece is calling for awareness of this horrible war that is still going on today.

Frank by
on November 15th, 2017
in Art

10 Amazing Galleries & Museums for Contemporary Art in Berlin

artwork: Haegue Yang, photo Marco Funke

We’re always keeping you up to date on the coolest contemporary art exhibitions in town – highlighting every art week and pointing you right to the hottest galleries whenever we suggest a route for a particular hood. The Berlin crowd is famous for channeling their creativity in the most unusual ways so no wonder you always enjoy these tips! That’s why we thought we might just go ahead and present you a guide of the 10 most important contemporary art places in the city.

Michalina by
on November 14th, 2017
in Art, Galleries, Kreuzberg, Mitte, Museums, Neukölln, Schöneberg, Tiergarten

How Berlin is Redefining Masculinity

photo: Liam Warton

No other city in the world gives us so much space to discuss and observe different gender stereotypes like Berlin. While walking down Kottbusser Damm all the way to Hermannplatz you can encounter many different types of typical Berlin men. The buff Turkish smartphone shop owner, the thin and elegant androgynous fashion design student shopping fabrics at Maybachufer, the Scandinavian exchange student with long jesus hair and beard sipping a coffee-to-go in a recyclable cup, the German punk cuddling his dog. All these men sound like cliches of course. But cliches that I actually encounter quite regularly. This is how Berlin and its citizen make you aware that there is no strict norm here on how a man should look like and behave like in other parts of the world. A city where playing with gender and identity is nothing unusual but rather the norm.

Reflecting on the softness of men my dear friend and curator Laetitia Duveau from Curated by Girls is launching a brand new exhibition called New Masculinity this Saturday. The show will feature the works of 4 artists who found each other on Instagram and teamed up to drive attention to a new and different portrayal of masculinity. Giving you a little excitement for the opening on November 11 check out a preview from the artist Annika Weertz, Joseph Barrett, Liam Warton and Phoebe Jane Barrett !

Claudio by
on November 10th, 2017
in Art

Street Art Intervention: Demonic Beauties from Berlin in the Paris Metro

Berlin’s iconic subway has gotten its fair share of street art interventions, such as the train filled with leaves or the one equipped with extra surveillance cameras. Our subway stations also got temporarily adorned with some bold graffitis like the big smiley or the two hands.

Berlin-based artist and street art interventionist Vermibus also once used the Berlin subway stations as a gallery. For his bizarrely obscured advertising posters of fashion and beauty products he changes the perfect models into demonic creatures by painting over the prints with dissolvent. His work also made its way through Europe in the following years. His latest series brought him to the Metro in Paris. What a perfect match these fashion demons are for Paris!

If you want to see his work up-close and personal you should come to his new solo exhibition In Absentia that will open this Thursday on November 9th 2017 at Open Walls Gallery and run through November 25. Enjoy a making of video of his Paris intervention below.

Frank by
on November 8th, 2017
in Art

VOLUME A: Wisdoms of Curating an Exhibition in Berlin

photo: Evelyn Bencicova

In a creative city like Berlin keeping up with the art world is a challenge most people just give up on. Where to go? There’s just so much to choose from! As we are aware of this, we wanna introduce an exhibition to you that is definitely worth a visit. Volume A will take place from the 3rd to the 5th of November in Colonia Nova, and has acclaimed contributing artists, such as Erwin Olaf and Bruce LaBruce. We had a chat with Nicolas Simoneau, art director of KALTBLUT Magazine, and photographer Manuel Moncayo about their exciting project and about curating exhibitions in Berlin.

Andy by
on November 3rd, 2017
in Art

A Storm of Thoughts & Threads: Lost Words by Chiharu Shiota

photo: Leo Seidel

Many years ago I encountered Chiharu Shiota’s work in Berlin and fell in love with her world of black wool threads.  Today I am really happy that the Berlin-based artist – even after her international success – is still exhibiting new works here in town regularly.

Inside the rather traditional St. Nicholas church museum located in the Nikoleiviertel where you would never expect to encounter her newest eye-gasmic art piece. To the occasion of the 500-year anniversary of the Reformation, Chiharu Shiota has created a spatial installation titled Lost Words transforming the whole church into a spider web of thoughts. The pages captured by her thread are the Ten Commandments in several languages. This relates to the Reformation in the sense that before that, the Bible was only read and taught in Latin which made religion only discussable and understandable for the rich and wealthy.

Even if you are not a religious type, Shiota’s work shows you the power of the written word. It shows how a simple idea, the idea of the translation of a sacred text, can have a lasting impact on the whole world as we know it. The address, more pictures, and a video of the making of the art piece after the jump.

Claudio by
on November 2nd, 2017
in Art, Mitte